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Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn's new album is called Echo In The Valley. Both artists have built lives on squeezing more sound, story and emotion out of the banjo than you may have thought possible — she in the clawhammer style of her hero Doc Watson, and he from the three-finger school of Earl Scruggs.

NPR Music 10: 2014

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January 5, 2014

NPR Music 10: 2007

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March 20, 2007

NPR Music 10: 2008

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February 19, 2008

NPR Music 10: 2015

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March 6, 2015

The last remaining sheet music store in Manhattan closes

It may have survived beyond its era, but when Frank Music Company, which had been open for 77 years, closed its doors on West 54th Street in Manhattan for the final time, it was the subject of tributes and pilgrimages from distraught fans. As its owner, Heidi Rogers wrote in a farewell note, the rise of Internet giants like Amazon had made the store "a shadow of its former self." We pay a cost for getting everything we want at the moment we want it. This was one.

NPR Music 10: 2010

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January 1, 2010

NPR Music 10: 2011

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NPR Music 10: 2012

13 hours ago

Feburary 11, 2012

Updated at 4:12 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is putting North Korea back on the State Department's list of state sponsors of terrorism. President Trump says the move "supports our maximum pressure campaign to isolate this murderous regime."

President Trump told reporters on Monday that the Treasury Department will officially announce additional sanctions and penalties on the North Korean regime on Tuesday.

Spit Test May Help Reveal Concussion Severity

14 hours ago

A little spit may help predict whether a child's concussion symptoms will subside in days or persist for weeks.

A test that measures fragments of genetic material in saliva was nearly 90 percent accurate in identifying children and adolescents whose symptoms persisted for at least a month, according to a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics.

That's in contrast to a concussion survey commonly used by doctors that was right less than 70 percent of the time.

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